… from the bungalow

Promises Guide: 11-15 (3 of 20) – The Little Professor

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This post comprises five promises from a dad to his son on five separate pages. At the bottom of each promise is a link to the next promise, or you can jump directly to a page within this post. Comments left will be visible on any of the five promise pages.

11) “I promise to share lots of music with you.”

The Little Professor doesn’t play with toys much. He doesn’t really “get” imaginative play all that well. What that means for us is that he either needs focused interaction to do something creative, or screen time (educational stuff on iPad, not-so-educational stuff on NintendoDS, or TV), and we have a no-video-games rule on school nights. [Note: he only owns an iPad because he uses it as an Augmentative and Alternative Communication device, and for the educational software.] But one thing he does love is music. For as little as he can actually say, and it’s very little–grunts, mostly–he loves to sing. It’s mostly just syllabic grunts, but it’s definitely music to my ears. Lately he’s been adding in gestures and hand motions with the more dramatic songs, and he loves to dance!

So for Yule (Christmastime) in lieu of toys that he’ll rarely-to-never play with, I got him a small mp3 player and put a bunch of Disney songs on it, along with a few classic favorites (Billy Joel, Heart, They Might Be Giants, etc.). I stuck it in a speaker carrying case, and I’ll be darned if he didn’t carry that thing everywhere he goes. It’s still not as entertaining has his iPad, but he loves it. And when he goes for the high note at the end of a dramatic song and lifts his hand in the air, it’s freaking magical.

Do This

First of all, don’t beat yourself up if you don’t always know what kind(s) of presents to buy for your kid. I struggle every single holiday and birthday to figure out what TLP will actually use and enjoy. And when you have two other typically-abled kids, it’s easy to run into guilty feelings over the fact that you know exactly what to buy them while remaining completely clueless about the other. And don’t mistake fixation for inspiration. Despite the fact that TLP asks to play his DS no less than 37 times a day, I do not buy him new DS games very often.

Do get creative. Does your child have sensory issues or fine motor delays? Get some Moon Sand or Silly Putty. Or better yet, make your own versions of Moon Sand or Silly Putty. Does he respond well to music? Play some music. Make some music. Have a dance party. The key here is trial and error and engagement. Sit and play with your kid, and if something doesn’t work out, do something else. You probably know your kid better than anyone. And if you don’t, make a point of getting there, then share in what he loves.

Take me back to the list!
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Continue to the next promise–>

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Author: Christopher Tucker

A dad with a self-evaluation complex. Also a music therapist, enrollment services associate, hippie-nerd.

7 thoughts on “Promises Guide: 11-15 (3 of 20) – The Little Professor

  1. “And when he goes for the high note at the end of a dramatic song and lifts his hand in the air, it’s freaking magical”. Couldn’t have said that any better. Thomas is currently belting out “Girl On Fire”. He’s pitchy, yes, but he’s so darn enthusiastic the sound doesn’t quite matter.

  2. “And when you have two other typically-abled kids, it’s easy to run into guilty feelings over the fact that you know exactly what to buy them while remaining completely clueless about the other.”

    For me, that’s the case with all gift giving. There are people that are incredibly easy to buy for, and those that are so much harder. Don’t beat yourself up. It’s normal! :)

  3. Pingback: 100th Blog Post: 100 promises to my family | ... from the bungalow

  4. Engage in the imagination! It’s quite amazing where it can take you. :) Memories are created when you’re not afraid to jump in, jump around, and think like a kiddo.

  5. Moon Sand! We love moon sand! We’ve got an entire sandbox full of the stuff out back. (More expensive than regular sand, but hey, that’s what in-laws are for.) One of my girls was diagnosed with Lyme’s disease at 6 months which we treated hard and fast. Can’t prove it, but we’re pretty sure it’s been the source of some gross motor delays. Her three year younger sister is more coordinated than she is. It’s always a challenge reminding myself to think outside of the (sand?)box to find ways to help her work on those skills. It’s hard finding the balance of accepting where she’s at and figuring out what she’s capable of, much less not pushing her to be where I want her to be. Ugh. Parenting, Peoples. It ain’t easy.

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